At Lavington School we believe that all students should have access to a broad and balanced curriculum. We believe equally that not everybody thrives on an identical diet.

Consequently, at Key Stage Three (Years 7, 8 and 9), we offer our students the same subject framework. The detail of what is taught, at what levels and the approach used differs according to the ability and achievement levels of the individual students.

Whatever the subject, the work presented to and demanded of our students is planned so that all can be challenged and supported as required.

What parents can do to help

The most important thing you can do as a parent is simply to take an interest in your child’s work. With this thought in mind this booklet has been produced to give you, as parents, a broad outline of the programmes of study your child will follow in the current school year.

Additionally, in each subject profile you will find a section headed ‘parental contribution’. The purpose of this is to provide positive suggestions of the ways in which you can become more actively involved in your child’s learning.

Sex and Relationship Education is an important part of the PSHE (personal skills and health education)  programme and the Science curriculum.  Parents should inform their child’s tutor if they do not wish them to take part in the Sex and Relationship Education part of the PSHE programme.

If you have any queries concerning the information provided here, do not hesitate to contact the appropriate Head of Department.

The importance of personal study time

Critical to success at school is the development of regular and effective personal study habits. Long before students reach the end of Year 9 they should have built up to two hours  of private study, Sunday to Thursday during term time (more for Years 10 and 11). Students should never say "I have no homework" - they always have work to do during their private study that will support their learning. There is a checklist in the student planner to help you support your son or daughter with this. Please encourage your son or daughter to take personal responsibility for their study time and help them to grow into effective, independant learners. All students would benefit from a designated study space at home - this need not be a desk - if space is at a premium perhaps all equipment and books could be stored in a box that can be easily brought out at the beginning of study time, and work completed on any table top that is in a warm and quiet place.  

 

Subject Leader: Mrs Hermione Best

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What are we studying?

Students will complete a nineteen week course in Art and Design comprising of one double lesson a week. Throughout their studies in Art in Year 7 students will develop their investigation of ideas inspired by the work of other artists, and their exploration of media and processes within the structured learning of key formal elements. Topics covered are;

 ‘Taking a line for a walk’– Line and shape, recording using line in a range of media

3D on a 2D page’ – Tone and form, recording light and shade  

‘Making your Mark’ – Texture and mark making, exploring marks on paper and with ceramic work

Colour, Emotion and Culture’ – Investigations into colour theory and colour associations

Practical artistic activities including; drawing from imagination and observation using a range of media, painting and printing including block and stencil printing, ICT animation, pencil and charcoal drawing and ceramics.

How are we assessed?

Classwork (practical and theory work) and homework is assessed throughout the course.  Students will be given success criteria and grading step descriptors linked to the work.  Work will be given grading step, which enables their progress to be monitored.  The assessments may be carried out in lessons or set as homework. 

How are we grouped?

Students are in mixed ability groups in Art, Design and Technology, and are timetabled for two double lessons a week in this subject area.  The maximum class size is 23. 

What homework are we expected to do?

There will usually be one homework task set every other week, which should take around 30 minutes to complete.  All the homework assignments will relate to classwork activities either in the form of design preparation e.g. ideas; observational drawings, planning and research (books and internet) or completing a unit of work by evaluating what has been learnt.  All homework will be available on the school computer database under Student Resources. Students will be given an Art Sketchbook to complete both class and homework into; it is their responsibility to follow given guidelines for the presentation of work and to keep their work safe as they transport their classwork and homework to and from school.

What can parents do to help?

  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learnt each week as they are looking through their Art sketchbook.
  • Provide opportunities for art work at home, to include a space to work and objects to record.
  • Encourage gallery visits. Look out for articles in newspapers or television and discuss them with your child.
  • Useful resources and equipment:
    • A 2B Sketching pencil,
    • A good metal pencil sharpener,
    • A large white rubber
    • A set of colouring pencils.
  • Access to the internet for research tasks

 Other relevant information: There will be a small charge to cover the cost of materials for any 3D projects that the student wishes to take home.

pdf iconMore information on levels

Subject Leader: Miss Lucy Burgess

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We are a vibrant, caring, exciting and innovative department where students are challenged, achieve highly and enjoy a wide range of ‘creative’ experiences. Our primary aim for drama is to enable our students to develop their creative minds, become sensitive to the needs of others as well as communicate effectively.

What are we studying?

In Drama at Lavington School, we aim to build confidence, form great relationships and promote excellent teamwork. Students will participate in performance, creating and responding to work they have seen both professionally and in lesson. They have a broad program of study which enhances both their knowledge of drama and dramatic skill and also gives them perspective of the wider world.

Year 7

Terms 1 and Term 2
The Twits
Darkwood Manor

Term 3 and Term 4
Private Peaceful
Puppets and Bullying

Term 5  and Term 6
Story Telling
Super Heroes

How are we assessed?

Each topic lasts for approximately one term. At the end of the topic students’ knowledge, skills and understanding of drama is assessed by curriculum levels.

This will be compared to their target level to measure progress and performance.

How we provide for SEN and Most able students?

SEN and most able students are catered for in individual lessons based upon need. This may be in the form of placement in group work to enable an appropriate mix of ability that stretches both the lower and higher end of abilities. There is a group work mark as part of assessment that allows students who are less able performers to be recognised for their input. The most able students are challenged by a more demanding role in performance work. All students are supported appropriately by the class teacher. At KS3, there is the Lavington Youth theatre that offers further challenge to al abilities.

How are we grouped?

Students are always taught in mixed ability classes. During lesson time, students work in pairs, small groups and mixed gender groupings. 

What homework are we expected to do?

Drama is a practical subject but students will be asked to complete two home works per topic which might include research for a topic or some preparation for a performance such as learning lines or preparing a plot

What can parents do to help?

Ask your child what has happened in their drama lesson and encourage them to complete any homework tasks set. Please provide your child with a soft shoe for Drama, such as a trainer or a plimsoll/dap in order that they can use the staging in the Drama studio.

pdf iconMore information on levels

Subject Leader: Miss Hayley Syrett

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Deputy Subject Leader in charge of KS3: Mrs Charlotte Burrows

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What are we studying?

The Year 7 curriculum is organised into six units covering the requirements of the English National Curriculum and drawing on the advised learning objectives included within the Assessing Pupils’ Progress in English framework.

All Year 7 students will study: a non-fiction writing unit based around myths, legends and biblical allusions; a modern novel - this will be from the ‘Harry Potter’ series; a poetry unit; an introduction to Shakespeare's World; a creative writing unit within the quest and adventure genre, and a 19th Century novel. Within the normal English lesson timetable, we also visit the library once a week where students spend part of the lesson reading and part of the lesson completing activities to improve their grammar. Some students who require extra support with reading and comprehension will take part in the Accelerated Reader programme during the weekly library lesson.

We aim to offer a wide variety of teaching and learning activities in order to engage all learners. Just a few examples of activities your child may learn through are: close reading of texts, cloze exercises, role play, group discussion, oral presentations, hot seating, and storyboards. All classrooms are equipped with interactive whiteboards and we have our very own computer room which students will visit at least once a week.

Each core unit will offer a wide variety of activities to develop and improve students' Speaking and Listening, Reading and Writing skills. We hope to equip your son/daughter with an appreciation and enjoyment of the subject as well as skills appropriate to their GCSEs.

How do we assess?

There will be one main assessment focus each term – either reading or writing. Students will complete a practice assessment task (AP1) half way through the term in preparation for their final assessment (AP2) which will take place towards the end of a term. Detailed feedback will be given for AP1 which will be used to inform a range of ‘upgrade’ tasks designed to help students make further progress towards their target step. The level achieved by students will be awarded for each formally assessed task and at the end of each term.

How are we grouped?

Groupings in Year 7 are initially based on the KS2 SATs scores and students are placed into one of 2 bands accordingly to ability; each band having 3-4 groups. We do not finely set in English preferring to take a more banded approach, which is why there are no numerical identifications of groups; e.g. Set 1, on student timetables. Each of our classes are instead identified by author names, with Year 7’s theme being Harry Potter character names.  However, all classes are taught to the highest target grade, providing stretch, challenge and support for all students in order to meet or exceed their target grades.

These groups are regularly reviewed and adjusted, and anyone clearly mis-placed is moved as soon as possible. These movements will be based on assessments and work completed during the course of Year 7.

How we provide for SEN and Most able students?

We aim to deliver lessons that both support and challenge our students. Those identified as SEN will receive support through differentiated tasks in lessons, and will often have the support of a TA.

Our most able students also benefit from differentiated tasks both in classwork and homework. Extension activities are used during lessons allowing students who finish tasks quickly to access more challenging work, but in an independent manner.

What homework are we expected to do?

Each unit of work lasts approximately six weeks and, typically, students will be set one homework task per week which should be completed in their class exercise book and should take around 30 minutes to complete. Typical tasks will include: spelling tests, self-quizzing from knowledge organisers links to in-class study, ‘Pick and Mix’ activities, research, pre-reading for in class study, and creative expression of core knowledge; e.g. designing a theatre poster.

Pupils are also expected to read every day outside of lessons; we suggest for 20 minutes. We expect parents to play an active role in monitoring their child’s reading. All students should have a book in school every day.

What can parents do to help?

Your help is very much appreciated and here are a few ideas about how you can support your children with their homework:

  • Talk to your child about how to approach the task set.
  • Discuss his or her reading; listen to him/her read
  • Help your child to look up unfamiliar vocabulary and to learn it
  • Proof-read work with your child (please advise us of the help you have given)
  • Test on spellings etc
  • Encourage the meeting of deadlines
  • Encourage your children to take an active interest in current affairs and to feel comfortable discussing their opinions

Parents are encouraged to monitor students' homework and offer guidance wherever possible.  The presence of books in the home and adults/older children being seen to read cannot be under-estimated.

Please do not hesitate to make contact with your son's/daughter's teacher in the first instance, in the event of problems or queries.

Useful resources and equipment:

A good dictionary or thesaurus at home. Easy access to a variety of novels or texts – encouraging students to read a daily newspaper is helpful. Access to a computer is not a necessity.

pdf iconMore information on levels

Subject Leader: Mrs Rachel Roberts

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What are we studying?

Students will complete a twenty week course in Food & Nutrition comprising of one double lesson a week.  The topics covered are the study of nutrition, food hygiene and safety in the kitchen, principles and application of a healthy, balanced diet based upon current dietary guidelines and the ‘Eat well Plate’: Five a day, Carbohydrates, Starch, Sugar, Fibre, diet related disorders including obesity, tooth decay, digestive ailments and the concept of energy balance.  Environmental considerations (sustainability, seasonality, food miles, waste management, composting and growing your own fruit and vegetables) pertinent to the course are developed further for study.

As well as nutrition and food science theory work, a significant proportion of the course is a practical skills based curriculum focussing on a range of food preparation techniques to make delicious food products that can be enjoyed at home by the whole family, based upon the principles of healthy eating and nutrition.  Practical work includes carbohydrate based salads, fruit and vegetable preparation, scones, crumbles, scone based pizza, fruit desserts, pinwheels, muffins, bread and fruit drinks.

How are we assessed?

Classwork (practical and theory work) and homework is assessed throughout the Food course.  Students will be given success criteria and KS3 Assessment ‘Steps’ descriptors linked to the work.  For each practical and/or theory task students will be given a national curriculum level, which enables their progress to be monitored.  The assessments may be carried out in lessons or set as homework.  In addition, students complete one complete Design and Make Assessment in the Food Technology course, which focuses on elements of the design process.   Analysis, research (gathering and using information), food product design, development, manufacture and sensory evaluation are areas of the design process that are explored through this assessment towards the end of the course. 

All tasks are differentiated to address the individual needs of all students through careful planning, including:

  • Outcome (learning objective)
  • Task
  • Process (the method of teaching)
  • Pupil grouping
  • Tailoring the content of the lesson for the individual (personalised learning agenda)
  • Provision (access to support & specialists)
  • Choice and self-direction
  • Learning style

SEN students will be supported appropriately by class teacher and teaching assistants. Group size will be adjusted appropriately to allow more teacher time to support students’ progress. 

How are we grouped?

Students are in mixed ability groups in Art, Design and Technology, and are timetabled for two double lessons a week in this subject area.  The maximum class size is 23. 

What homework are we expected to do?

There will usually be one homework task set per week, which should take around 30 minutes to complete.  This will include research activities, work sheets, design and development work, and the evaluation of practical work.  In addition, students are expected to use plan their practical activities at home, by organising, weighing and preparing their ingredients for the practical lessons.  Recipes will be given out by the class teacher one week prior to the practical lesson (and they can also be accessed through students resources on the school computer database).  Practise of the practical skills in the holidays or at weekends is desirable.  Students will be given a D&T folder to store and transport their classwork and homework to and from school. Students are encouraged to share favourite recipes and also read around the subject area to support their understanding and development of scientific vocabulary.

What can parents do to help?

  • Provision of ingredients for practical lessons. Students are offered some minor adaptions to recipes to ensure the practical work will be enjoyed by the whole family.  We can accommodate any dietary restriction, but please advise the class teacher prior to practical work commencing.  This will be treated sensitively and confidentially.
  • Provision of a large named container (plastic or tin container would be suitable) to transport ingredients to and from school.
  • Use of weighing scales and measuring jug/equipment at home are essential.
  • Ask your child to explain the meaning of the scientific vocabulary that is new to each module.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learnt each week as they are looking through their D&T folder.
  • Look out for articles in newspapers or television and discuss them with your child.
  • Parents can also encourage an interest in food and healthy eating.
  • Sharing recipes, practising food preparation skills and cooking at home are actively encouraged by class teachers

Useful resources and equipment

  • Recipe books
  • Ruler, colouring pencils
  • Computer is useful for presentation, but not essential.

More information on levels:

pdf iconSpecification

pdf iconAnalysis & Research

pdf iconDesign and develop

pdf iconPlan and make

pdf iconEvaluate

 

Subject Leader: Mrs Amy Coates

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What are we studying?

Students develop skills in understanding written and spoken French and in actively using the language to speak and write.  They develop a wide range of language learning techniques, which will aid them in learning across the curriculum and with any language they may choose or need to study in the future.

We follow the course “Studio” which consists of a pupil book, audio and video files as well as an online learning package.  Students study five or six different topic areas and each topic covers a wide range of vocabulary, culture and several elements of grammar. All students begin the year with an access unit that covers basic vocabulary and grammar. This access unit builds on language studied at primary school and fills in any gaps for students who have not studied French before.

How are we assessed?

Students have regular vocabulary, spelling and grammar tests.

They complete at least two written tasks per topic, which are graded, in terms of expected progress towards target, as either +, = or -. These tasks are given a level (for example 3=) once students have responded to their teacher’s feedback and they have made the necessary improvements.

Students complete one speaking or writing assessment as well as reading and listening assessments at the end of each topic, this is usually four times a year.  These assessments are completed in class in test conditions. For each assessment, students will be given a level and this will be compared to their target level to measure progress and performance.

How are we grouped?

Groupings in Year 7 are initially based on the SATs scores and data from primary schools. Students are placed into one of 2 bands accordingly to ability. Each band has three groups. Our maximum class size is 32 but groups are often slightly smaller than this.

These groups are reviewed and adjusted throughout the year and anyone clearly very misplaced is moved as soon as possible. Set changes during the course of Year 7 need to be agreed by all subjects affected by a timetable change. Therefore, it is often the case that set movements do not take place until the end of the year. These movements are based on assessments and work completed during the course of Year 7.

Students in set 6 for English do not study a foreign language and receive additional literacy support.

What homework are we expected to do?

  • All students are given a username and password for their Studio online learning account and they should log-on at least once a week. (www.pearsonactivelearn.com)
  • Students need to learn vocabulary and spellings every day. Spelling and vocabulary tests give teachers a good indication of whether a student is completing their homework but it should be remembered that the purpose of these activities is to build students’ French vocabulary. It is much more effective to learn spellings and vocabulary for five minutes every day, rather than 30 minutes the night before the test. Learning in regular intervals drastically improves the chance of the words being stored in the long-term memory. If spelling/vocabulary homework is not set they can choose ten words or an item of grammar that they found challenging to work on.
  • Students are also set homework activities consisting of reading, grammar practice, speaking practice and writing tasks. They do not normally receive more than one homework task per week, in addition to vocabulary learning. At the end of each topic, students need to learn and revise thoroughly for the end of topic assessments.

 What can parents do to help?

Review exercise book regularly. Discuss your child’s progress with him/her.

Ensure that students learn vocabulary at home for at least 5 minutes every day. Support them with making flash cards and/or using the ‘look, cover, write and check’ method to learn spellings. If spelling/vocabulary homework is not set they can choose ten words or an item of grammar that they found challenging to work on.

Provide an “easy learning” bi-lingual dictionary and encourage your child to use it when completing written homework.

Direct students to vocabulary building and grammar practice websites such as  www.French-games.net and www.languagesonline.org.uk.


Provide students with as much visual and audio stimulus as possible, for example, French magazines, French film, French radio/TV and, if possible, a trip to France.

 

pdf iconMore information on levels 

Subject Leader: Ms. Naomi Alford

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What are we studying? 

Term 1

What is geography?

Students are introduced to the three areas of geography.

Map Skills

Pupils undertake work covering a range of skills using a variety of resources.

Term 2

Our Diverse Society

This unit explores the students’ connections to other places and gradually extends outwards – from school to local area to national and international scales.

Term 3

Weather

How do we measure and forecast the weather?

Term 4

Climate – What are the factors that influence climate?

Term 5

Africa

Investigating contrasting landscapes and cultures.

Term 6

The Urban Landscape

In this unit students investigate the impact that people have upon the natural environment and consider the issues through examples taken from the rich world and the poor world.  We begin by studying the structure of a typical British city then move on to look at sustainable living.  Students explore how the future may look in terms of our homes and the way in which we go about our daily lives. 

How are we assessed?

  • Questioning students during class activities to check knowledge, understanding and skills.
  • A variety of Assessment for Learning tasks.
  • Homework tasks.
  • Some testing.
  • Plenary activities.

How are we grouped?

Pupils are grouped according to their end of KS2 data.  These groups are not set by the geography Department.

What home learning tasks are students expected to do?

  • Pupils will undertake activities at home that will complement and extend the work done in class.
  • Learn key geographical vocabulary.
  • Creative writing.
  • Model making.
  • Investigation.

What can parents do to help?

Parental support is encouraged at all times and would typically include:

  • Taking an active interest in the areas of study
  • Checking your son/daughter’s exercise book.
  • Watching geographical television programmes and films with your son /daughter.
  • Encouraging your son/daughter to read books, newspapers or internet articles relevant to the area of study.
  • Helping your son/daughter to prepare for tests and to complete tasks on time.

 

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Subject Leader: Mrs Diane Bray

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What are we studying?

Students will complete a twenty week course in Graphics comprising of one double lesson a week.  The topics covered are; lettering, where we analyse the use of typography in design and we study the basics of logo type and the correct formation of lettering. We look at one point and two point perspective, which enables students to begin to understand how to construct their ideas into fully accurate representations. We run two main projects one of which is based upon logo design which includes colour theory. The other is a celebration card pop up which is based upon the construction of a card that incorporates a mechanical function. Both projects enhance and develop the student’s ability to understand the underlying principles of design. We study potential target markets, market trends and we briefly touch on group dynamics. We research existing products analysing their successes with reference to how established they are, who they would appeal to and how we determine success. The design and make tasks are centred on the development of the students ability to create promotional materials to  encourage sales of their designs, whilst looking at the principles of marketing and advertising in order to assist them with decision making.

How are we assessed?

Classwork (practical and theory work) and homework is assessed throughout the Graphics course.  Students will be given success criteria and national curriculum level descriptors linked to the work.  For each practical and/or theory task students will be given a national curriculum level, which enables their progress to be monitored.  The assessments may be carried out in lessons or set as homework.  In addition, students complete one complete Design and Make Assessment in the Graphics course, which focuses on elements of the design process.   Analysis, research (gathering and using information), product design, development, manufacture and evaluation are areas of the design process that are explored through this assessment towards the end of the course. 

How are we grouped?

Students are in mixed ability groups in Art, Design and Technology, and are timetabled for two double lessons a week in this subject area.  The maximum class size is 23. 

What homework are we expected to do?

There will usually be one homework task set per fortnight, of which the majority are set in order to consolidate learning from that day’s lesson or for preparation for the following lesson. 
The home work tasks should take around 30 minutes to complete.  This will include research activities, worksheets, design and development work or completion of class tasks.  Students will be given a D&T folder to store and transport their classwork and homework to and from school. Students are encouraged read around the subject area to support their understanding and development of subject specific vocabulary.

What can parents do to help?

  • Ask your child to explain the meaning of the subject vocabulary that is new to each module.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learnt each week as they are looking through their D&T folder.
  • Look out for articles in newspapers or television and discuss them with your child.

Useful resources and equipment:

o   Ruler, colouring pencils, HB pencil, rubber, sharpener and compass.

o   Computer is useful for research tasks and presentation, but not essential.

 

pdf iconMore information on levels